Daniel Gebhart Tavern Restoration

 
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Miamisburg Historical Society

Miamisburg Historical Society
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Daniel Gebhart Tavern Restoration

These restoration pictures honor the vision and work of Roscius C. Doan and Joseph Pollock before restoration began at the tavern.

Rotten logs and inappropriate openings were removed. Replacement logs were salvaged from demolished area houses and barns. They were notched and spliced into building. Over 40% of the logs were either replaced or spliced.

The original first floor joist system was completely deteriorated due to termites and floods. (A bat was found living in the Summer Beam.) All joists were replaced with salvaged beams.

The floor you see today was salvaged from the old Fairborn Stage coach stop.

Phase I completed Spring 1980.

Due to minor deterioration, the 2nd floor summer beam was reinforced with steel so that replacement would not be a necessity.

Phase II was begun October 1981. To meet the expected load of a museum, the 2nd floor had to be reinforced. New popular beams, similar to originals, were hand made and installed as additional joists.

The stones in the chimneys are from a local barn that was destroyed by a tornado.

The daubing was made from a mixture of sand, lime and hog’s hair, to imitate the original material we also added a small quantity of Portland cement, for strength.

The paving stones outside were salvaged from a canal warehouse in Miamisburg.

All the wrought iron hardware was hand made by Paul Wood, master blacksmith emeritus of Carriage Hill farm.

Chimneys and fireplaces were built by Pottinger and Crider Masonry. Size and placement of the Chimneys were determined by evidence found in the foundations and in the floor framing.

Fortunately samples of all the original woodwork remained. Partition walls, doors, window trim, door trim, baseboards and chair rail were fabricated to match the originals. Where possible, original woodwork was salvaged and reused. Replacements were made of poplar. Originally, the woodwork was a mixture of walnut and poplar.

Phase II also brought poplar siding in the gable ends; a cedar shingle roof, and window sash glazed with old glass. Certain concessions to modern living were made: Gutters and downspouts, a gas furnace (concealed by the chimneys), attic insulation, and electricity concealed by the chinking.

Architectural Reclamation, Inc. Franklin, Ohio

The Bar in the taproom was made by Terry and Frankie Lewis with lumber donated by their grandfather, Louis Times. Terry, an employee of the Canal Works, and Frankie of the Post Office of Miamisburg, also hung all the cabinets and Terry did the mantels.

What began in 1975 as an asbestos brick covered rental duplex is now an authentic log cabin, comfortable in the fashion of 1811.

 

 

 Enjoy the Restoration Pictures

Tavern before restoration

The Tavern was a brick covered rental duplex before restoration began

 

Tavern before restoration

Here is another picture of the Tavern before restoration. It is amazing that the original structure survived under all of the additions and natural disasters.

 

After some restoration

The porch was removed and also the siding on part of the tavern. You can already see some of the logs.

 

restoration continues

Rotten logs and inappropriate openings were removed. Replacement logs were salvaged from demolished area houses and barns. They were notched and spliced into building. Over 40% of the logs were either replaced or spliced.

 

another outside picture

Another outside picture.

 

Dovetail construction

Here you can see the original dovetail construction.

 

Dovetail contstruction

Here is another picture of the original dovetail construction.

 

outside picture

Here you can see more of the tavern before restoration. Also the sign describing this structure.

 

bad deterioration of structure

Here you can see the bad deterioration of the structure over the years.

 

more rotten logs

A lot of the wood was rotten due to termites, floods, and time.

 

Major construction going on

Standing inside looking out. There is major reconstruction going on.

 

Dovetail construction

All of the old plaster and other things used to fill in between the logs over the years have been removed.

 

Removing extra openings

More of the extra openings that have been added over the years are being removed.

 

Another outside picture

Another outside picture during reconstruction.

 

Lots of work going on

There was a lot of work to save the original structure and remove all the other construction over the years.

 

Working hard

Working hard at the reconstruction.

 

Looking down from roof

Looking down from the roof.

 

Replacement logs being made

The replacement logs were made in the same way as the originals were made. This included the dovetail construction techniques.

 

 

Original floor

The original first floor joist system was completely deteriorated due to termites and floods. All joists were replaced with salvaged beams.

 

Tavern floor

Another picture of the tavern floor.

 

A different picture of floor

The floor you see today was salvaged from the old Fairborn Stage coach stop.

 

Tavern taking shape

Most of the extra openings that were not original have been closed up. That tavern is now looking familiar.

 

In basement

In basement looking up. Also electricity was added. Phase I completed Spring 1980.

 

Making some replacement logs

New poplar beams, similar to originals, were hand made and installed as additional joists.

 

Reinforcing second floor

Phase II was begun October 1981. To meet the expected load of a museum, the 2nd floor had to be reinforced.

 

Reinforcing second floor

2nd floor being reinforced.

 

More work on first floor

More work on first floor.

 

2nd floor

Second floor of tavern. Due to minor deterioration, the 2nd floor summer beam was reinforced with steel so that replacement would not be a necessity.

 

Chimney 2nd floor

The stones in the chimneys are from a local barn that was destroyed by a tornado.

 

Chimney first floor

Chimneys and fireplaces were built by Pottinger and Crider Masonry. Size and placement of the Chimneys were determined by evidence found in the foundations and in the floor framing.

 

daubing

The daubing was made from a mixture of sand, lime and hog’s hair, to imitate the original material. A small quantity of Portland cement was also added for strength.

 

Paving stones

The paving stones outside were salvaged from a canal warehouse in Miamisburg.

 

Paving stones

Another paving stone picture.

 

Wrought iron being made

All the wrought iron hardware was hand made by Paul Wood, master blacksmith emeritus of Carriage Hill farm.

 

More wrought iron

More wrought iron being made.

 

wrought iron in chimney

Wrought iron in chimney.

 

Fortunately samples of all the original woodwork remained. Partition walls, doors, window trim, door trim, baseboards and chair rail were fabricated to match the originals. Where possible, original woodwork was salvaged and reused. Replacements were made of poplar. Originally, the woodwork was a mixture of walnut and poplar.

 

Front door

Main door of tavern. Notice the wrought iron.

 

In bedroom upstairs

In bedroom upstairs.

 

In bedroom upstairs

In bedroom upstairs after window was added.

 

Small bedroom

In small bedroom upstairs looking out.

 

Bedroom upstairs

Bedroom upstairs.

 

Phase II also brought poplar siding in the gable ends; a cedar shingle roof, and window sash glazed with old glass. Certain concessions to modern living were made: Gutters and downspouts, a gas furnace (concealed by the chimneys), attic insulation, and electricity concealed by the chinking.

 

inside picture

Another inside picture.

 

Door handle

Wrought iron door handle.

 

window shudders

Outside looking at windows.

 

Tavern

Outside of tavern after reconstruction.

 

tavern outside

What began in 1975 as an asbestos, brick covered, rental duplex is now restored to its original design. The tavern is an authentic log cabin, comfortable in the fashion of 1811.

 

Roscius C. Doan

 

Joseph Pollock

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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